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VIRUS H5N1 => EUROPE - ANIMAUX => Europe => Grèce - Articles animaux => Discussion démarrée par: alain le 16 février 2006 à 19:30:51

Titre: 2 cas supplementaires
Posté par: alain le 16 février 2006 à 19:30:51
http://www.turkishpress.com/news.asp?id=108409

Greece confirms two more positive cases of H5N1 in wild birds
02-16-2006, 12h50
ATHENS (AFP)

 la grece confirme 2 cas de plus de H5N1 dans les oiseaux sauvages
Birds are seen near the village of Kalohori, some 12 kms west of Thessaloniki. The Greek agriculture ministry announced that two more wild swans had tested positive for H5N1 avian flu, bringing to six the total number of cases in the country of the highly pathogenic strain of the virus
(AFP)
 
The Greek agriculture ministry announced that two more wild swans had tested positive for H5N1 avian flu, bringing to six the total number of cases in the country of the highly pathogenic strain of the virus.
le nombre de cas se montent à 6The announcement came Thursday after the European Union's Reference Laboratory for Avian Influenza in Weybridge, England, confirmed the bird samples had tested positive.

The two dead swans both came from northern Greece. One was found in the sea one kilometre (half a mile) from the waterfront of the port city of Salonika, the second in a coastal area 90 kilometres (56 miles) east of the city.
un cygne pres du port de salonique le deuxieme sur la zone cotiere à 90 km de la ville
The ministry said "no additional measures" were necessary to ensure safety around the areas where the dead birds have been found, since protective zones had been put in place several days earlier, when infected bird carcasses were first discovered.

Greece has been on avian flu alert since the H5N1 strain of the virus killed four people in neighbouring Turkey earlier this year.

The authorities stepped up surveillance measures after the virus was first detected in three dead swans in northern Greece on February 11.

Two days later, a dead goose from the Aegean Sea island of Skyros was also confirmed to be a carrier of the virulent strain of the virus, which can kill humans.

The outbreak has raised alarm in Greece, leading people to "check themselves into hospital over the slightest suspicion" of flu-related symptoms, Panagiotis Efstathiou, chairman of Greece's state health sector coordinating agency (SOTY), told AFP.

A 78-year-old Greek woman was under supervision in the northern city of Edessa, with results on her avian flu tests expected on Friday.

The woman was expected to be released, pending her final tests, as she had no fever, Efstathiou said.

Three more people have also tested negative for avian flu in recent days, having been hospitalised as a precaution after handling dead birds.

Hoping to reach remote areas in the Greek countryside, the health ministry this week asked the Greek Orthodox Church to help inform the public on avian flu safeguards.

During their sermon on Sunday, Orthodox priests across the country have been asked to read out warnings against handling dead birds with bare hands, and a reminder to carefully clean kitchen utensils used in the cooking of poultry.